Tag:BW

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JCH Street Pan 400

An alternative for Black and White Film Shooters? I am always so excited whenever there is new film launched in the market, so I picked few rolls of JCH Street Pan 400 out of curiosity. I pre-assumed that this film is just a normal black and white film with high contrast and little details. But after the film was developed by lab. I was happy with the result and decided to try few rolls more. I spoke to the lab […]

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Kentmere, Kentmere 400, iso400, black and white negative film, movie, cinefilm, cine film, cinematography, highspeed, high iso, light sensitive, traditional black and white film, bnw, b&W film, analog, leica summicron 50mm, 50mm, shoot film, film lover, tahusa, film review, hong kong, film blog, emulsion, greyscale, difference from other black and white, comparison, difference, how, choose film, choose black and white film, pick, guide, gradation, tonal range, darkroom,

Kentmere 400

Ilford B&W negative alternative? Ilford film is pricy but with high quality. If you are looking for low-budgeted film that allows you to shoot more extensively, Kentmere is the best option for you to take some nice black and white photos. It is cheap, reliable and has the “Classical” grey tone. This film only available in 135 format. It would be great if it has medium format too. Name: Kentmere ISO: 400 Film type: Black and white Character: Broad tonal range, fine grain and […]

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Kodak, Eastman, 5222, Double-x, Double x, XX, Motion Picture, movie, cinefilm, cine film, cinematography, highspeed, high iso, light sensitive, traditional black and white film, bnw, b&W film, analog, leica summicron 50mm, 50mm, shoot film, film lover, tahusa, film review, hong kong, film blog, emulsion, greyscale, difference from other black and white, comparison, difference, how, choose film, choose black and white film, pick, guide, gradation, tonal range, darkroom,

Kodak Eastman 5222 Double-X

Motion picture black and white film? Most of you must have already been using motion picture colour negative film such as CineStill 50D, CineStill 800T…etc. Kodak Eastman 5222 Double-X is Kodak’s legendary 35mm black and white cine film available for use in 35mm camera. Films such as Schindler’s List (1993), Memento (2000) and Casino Royale (2006) have used Double-X to evoke strong emotions like only black-and-white can do. Name: Kodak Eastman 5222 Double-X ISO: 200 (Tungsten), 250 (Daylight) Film type: Black and white Character: Medium contrast with medium […]

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ilford, professional, Delta, Delta 400, iso400, 400, highspeed, high iso, light sensitive, traditional black and white film, bnw, b&W film, analog, leica summicron 50mm, 50mm, exile, koudelka, peter lindbergh, shoot film, film lover, tahusa, film review, hong kong, film blog, emulsion, greyscale, comparison, difference, how, choose film, choose black and white film, pick, guide

Ilford Delta Professional 400

Ilford Delta 400 Name: Ilford Delta Professional ISO: 400 Film type: Black and white Character: Fine grain, high sharpness with medium contrast Difference between Delta 400 and HP5+ Ilford Delta 400 is a high-speed black and white film which has a modern emulsion (tabular-grain film) that can result with finer grain but with less latitude. I would say its tone belongs to the modern days while Ilford HP5+ belongs to the past with more grain and tonal range. Delta 400 gives you a […]

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ilford, hp5+, hp5, plus, iso400, 400, highspeed, high iso, light sensitive, traditional black and white film, bnw, b&W film, analog, yashica T5, shoot film, film lover

Ilford HP5 Plus 400

Ilford HP5 Plus 400 Which black and white film should I start with? For people who are new to photography, this is one of the most often asked questions. People are usually either impressed by the unique result produced from the black and white film or are attracted by the texture of the photo which cannot be replicated in digital format. In my opinion, shooting in black and white can help film shooters practice using different light sources and obtain […]

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