Kodak Tri-X vs Double-X Black and White Film Comparison

Kodak Tri-X 400 vs Double-X 250

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Black and White Film Comparison

Kodak Tri-X vs Double-X Black and White Film Comparison

Some say Kodak Tri-X 400 is the best in the world, it is a great journalistic style black and white film and also one of the easiest BW films to get in the market. Kodak Tri-X 400 uses classic grain structure, it is more coarse than T-grain  or Delta film. This classic grain structure feels more natural than tabular-grain film.

Around 10 years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to the Kodak Double-X and it is a motion picture film and he described it as having magnificent exposure latitude and he highly recommended me to shoot at ISO400. So far I have been using this film for 10 years and it is one of my primary black and white films (sometimes I use HP5 or Ilford Pan 400 because I can push it and use it at ISO 1600). 

If you like a more distinct black and white style probably Kodak Double-X is something more suitable to you but if you are mainly shooting during the day and you like that classic traditional black and white tone, Tri-X 400 may be the better option.

If you are looking for a cheap alternative to Kodak Tri-X or Ilford HP5, This Double-X film is a great option and most of them are bulk loaded. Let’s look into their tones and characteristics of both films.

kodak-tri-x-trix-400-vs-versus-compare-eastman-5222-250-doublex-double-x-film-black-and-white-negative-bw-135-performance-character-difference-texture-grain-structure-d76-hc110
Kodak Tri-X vs Kodak Double-X

Characters and Tones

Kodak Tri-X

  • Overall greyish tone
  • Photojournalistic with great texture for documentary
  • Grainy (More Noise)
  • Classic Black and white look
  • T-grained film now more fine grained
  • Easy to find online and retail

Kodak Eastman Double-X

  • Finer grain
  • Better latitude
  • Less highlight details
  • Better low light details than Tri-X 
  • Better contrast
  • Great for pushing up to ISO800
  • Usually bulk loaded or CineStill branded

Kodak Tri-X Samples

Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222 Samples

Review for Kodak Tri-X and Kodak Eastman 5222 Double-X

If you are new to black and white film and want to understand more about each of their characters. You can refer to my film reviews Kodak Tri-X and Kodak Eastman 5222 Double-X

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5 Comments

  1. To the best of my knowledge Tri-X still uses traditional grain and not T grain. I believe only the TMAX films use T grain.

      • Very nice article. Loved the sample shots. It usually comes down to personal tastes, but I tend to prefer Tri-X to the Double X. However, your developer choice can make a huge difference, no matter which film you shoot though. I’ve used D76, Microdol X and Rodinal for Tri-X, and those negatives look completely different from each other.

        • Thank you Steve. Yes, I think the developer plays the major part. I am trying different developers but have yet to find the perfect one. Maybe it is good to just keep trying! Haha

          Anson

  2. Love the inquiry, posts, discussion, debate-it’s all informative and interesting! Remember, keep shooting film, it has a magic digital can’t touch!

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